Author: Dennis Grady, Jr.

The technology industry has come a long way from the dot-com era of the mid-1990s to early 2000s. Since Silicon Valley’s rise to fame, research parks, technology centers, universities and incubators across the country have emulated its success — becoming breeding grounds for highly sophisticated start-ups and game-changing innovations across industries.

The potential for exponential returns makes technology starts-ups an attractive option for investors. But while these entities share some similarities with traditional small businesses, they also come with a unique set of circumstances. Long lead time to see profits (if they ever come), a life cycle flush with active fundraising, and special considerations for entity structure and the ultimate exit are just a few of the challenges to overcome.

Read more: What to Consider When Investing in a Tech Start-Up

By: Bill Harrington

Hackers in the News

When large, brand-name companies like Target, Anthem and Home Depot are breached by hackers, they make front-page news and incur significant reputational losses. The amount of money that hacked companies spend to repair their reputation in the marketplace is staggering, which is why this is a topic of discussion on most Board agendas. Every day, hackers become faster and more sophisticated at exploiting newly-identified vulnerabilities in security architectures. These are not the hackers of the past, teenagers fishing around for information from a computer in their basement. They are highly educated and technically savvy individuals who hack into companies for the purpose of stealing information that can be resold on the “black market.” These breaches may also take the form of attacks from nation-states that seek to acquire industrial, military, or other confidential or classified information. What about your company? How prepared is your IT security plan to prevent such a breach?

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